Here are the details of Anglian Water’s investment in the East of England for 2016/17 broken down by county

Essex
• £3.8million to maintain and develop our Colchester Water Recycling Centre which serves the growing area. A further £900,000 will transform this site into a renewable energy site with Combined Heat and Power engines. It will produce renewable energy and biosolids which are sold to agriculture as soil conditioner
• £7million to survey and refurbish hundreds of kilometres of sewers in places like Southend, Lowestoft, Ipswich, Great Yarmouth and Beccles
• £2.7million for projects to improve bathing water quality in Southend with £35,000 set aside for aerial surveys to identify misconnected private drains and prevent them causing third party pollution to rivers and coastal waters. This project builds on an earlier, successful misconnections project in Southend.
• £470,000 to trace and investigate sources of diffuse pollution in and around Clacton, Jaywick and West Mersea which may be impacting bathing water quality. Plus £52,000 to extend our BeachCare programme, run in partnership with Keep Britain Tidy, which arranges beach cleans up and down the East of England coastline. BeachCare will be launched in West Mersea this year as well as in Cleethorpes and Humberton Fitties, and Hunstanton. There are already two successful BeachCare groups in Southend and one in Great Yarmouth.
• £2.4million to maintain and developing our Rayleigh Water Recycling Centre which serves the growing area
• £900,000 to upgrade our biosolids treatment process at the water recycling centre in Chelmsford
• £370,000 to refurbish the rising sewer main at Runwell
• £240,000 to match fund flood projects in collaboration with Essex’s partner agencies such as local authorities also responsible for the drainage system. This money will get more flood prevention schemes off the ground and help to overcome the challenges of often complex ownership responsibilities across the wider drainage network.
• Almost half a million pounds to better manage water pressure in our pipes in Colchester more effectively, reducing the likelihood of leaks and bursts by up to 60%
• We’re finding creative ways to encourage people to change their behaviour and reduce the amount of wipes and fats being put down the drains when it should go in the bin. £25,000 will be used to focus on visitors, residents and businesses in coastal towns like Southend, Jaywick, Lowestoft, Southwold, Great Yarmouth, Cleethorpes and Humberston Fitties, Skegness, Hunstanton and Heacham.

Norfolk
• £7million to survey and refurbish hundreds of kilometres of sewers in places like Great Yarmouth, Lowestoft, Ipswich, Beccles and Southend
• £9million to connect rural communities to the main sewerage network, including places like Bastwick, Hillington, Swafield and Bradfield – replacing private cess pits and tanks which can damage the environment.
• £4.3million for various maintenance and upgrades to the water and treatment equipment across Norfolk
• £900,000 to replace or upgrade sewers in Bunwell and reduce the likelihood of flooding
• £70,000 to match fund flood projects in collaboration with Norfolk’s partner agencies such as local authorities also responsible for the drainage system. This money will get more flood prevention schemes off the ground and help to overcome the challenges of often complex ownership responsibilities across the wider drainage network.
• £235,000 to trace and investigate sources of diffuse pollution in and around Heacham and Hunstanton, which may be impacting bathing water quality. Plus, £52,000 to extend our BeachCare programme, run in partnership with Keep Britain Tidy, which arranges beach cleans up and down the East of England coastline. BeachCare will be launched in Hunstanton, West Mersea, Cleethorpes and Humberton. It’s already successful in Great Yarmouth and Southend.
• £360,000 to protect the natural environment, specifically a protected species of Eel
• We’re finding creative ways to encourage people to change their behaviour and reduce the amount of wipes and fats being put down the drains when it should go in the bin. £25,000 will be used to engage with visitors, residents and businesses in coastal towns like Great Yarmouth, Hunstanton, Heacham, plus Southend, Jaywick, Lowestoft, Southwold, Skegness, Cleethorpes and Humberston.
• Hundreds of thousands of pounds in North Norfolk fitting free water meters, replacing old ones, and offering free water saving devices so customers remain in control of their bill

Suffolk
• £5.6million for various schemes to maintain and upgrade water recycling equipment serving Suffolk, and £4.8million for a similar range of water and water treatment improvements and upgrades.
• £7million to survey and refurbish hundreds of kilometres of sewers in places like Lowestoft, Ipswich, Beccles and Southend
• £2million to upgrade pumping stations in and around Bradwell, Great Yarmouth to reduce the historic risk of flooding and support future growth of the area
• £200,000 to trace and investigate sources of diffuse pollution in and around Southwold, which may be impacting bathing water quality. Plus £52,000 to extend our BeachCare programme, run in partnership with Keep Britain Tidy, which arranges beach cleans along the East of England coastline. BeachCare will be launched in West Mersea, Cleethorpes and Humberton Fitties, and Hunstanton. It’s already successful in Great Yarmouth and Southend.
• £195,000 to protect the natural environment, specifically a protected species of Eel
• We’re finding creative ways to encourage people to change their behaviour and reduce the amount of wipes and fats being put down the drains when it should go in the bin. £25,000 will be used to focus on visitors, residents and businesses in coastal towns like Lowestoft and Southwold, plus Great Yarmouth, Hunstanton, Heacham, Southend, Jaywick, Skegness, Cleethorpes and Humberston.

Cambridgeshire
• £6million to continue the resilience works already underway at our Grafham Water Treatment Works
• £1.4million to connect homes in Woodwalton to the mains sewerage network – replacing private cess pits and tanks which can damage the environment
• £800,000 to connect new properties in Brampton and Ely to the public sewer, enabling growth in our region
• £720,000 to protect the natural environment, specifically a protected species of Eel
• £260,000 to match fund flood projects in collaboration with Cambridgeshire’s partner agencies such as local authorities also responsible for the drainage system. This money will get more flood prevention schemes off the ground and help to overcome the challenges of often complex ownership responsibilities across the wider drainage network.
• Hundreds of thousands of pounds will be spent in and around Ely fitting free water meters, replacing old ones, and offering free water saving devices so customers remain in control of their bill
• Hundreds of children in Greater Peterborough will have the opportunity of a technical education thanks to Anglian Water becoming the lead sponsor of the new Greater Peterborough UTC, which aims to recruit more children into engineering and construction careers.

Lincs
• £1.6million to maintain and upgrade our water treatment works at Driby
• £1.3million to connect rural communities to the main sewerage network, including places like Little Humby and Toynton All Saints – replacing private cess pits and tanks which can damage the environment
• Almost half a million pounds to manage water pressure in our pipes in Lincoln more effectively, reducing the likelihood of leaks and bursts by as much as 60%
• £685,000 to protect the natural environment, specifically a protected species of Eel
• £165,000 to match fund flood projects in collaboration with Lincolnshire’s partner agencies such as local authorities also responsible for the drainage system. This money will get more flood prevention schemes off the ground and help to overcome the challenges of often complex ownership responsibilities across the wider drainage network.
• £260,000 to trace and investigate sources of diffuse pollution in and around Cleethorpes and Humberston Fitties, which may be impacting bathing water quality. Plus £52,000 to extend our BeachCare programme, run in partnership with Keep Britain Tidy, which arranges beach cleans along the East of England coastline. BeachCare will be launched in West Mersea, Cleethorpes, Humberton Fitties, and Hunstanton. It’s already successful in Great Yarmouth and Southend.
• We’re finding creative ways to encourage people to change their behaviour and reduce the amount of wipes and fats being put down the drains when it should go in the bin. £25,000 will be used to focus on visitors, residents and businesses in coastal towns like Skegness, Cleethorpes and Humberston, plus Lowestoft and Southwold, Great Yarmouth, Hunstanton, Heacham, Southend and Jaywick.

Northamptonshire
• £14million to upgrade and maintain the thousands of kilometres of sewers and various water recycling centres that serve the growing population of Northamptonshire
• £2million to connect new properties in Rothwell, Silverstone and Earls Barton to the public sewer, enabling growth in our region
• £95,000 to match fund flood projects in collaboration with Northamptonshire’s partner agencies such as local authorities also responsible for the drainage system. This money will get more flood prevention schemes off the ground and help to overcome the challenges of often complex ownership responsibilities across the wider drainage network.
• £250,000 to maintain and improve our water supply network in Bozeat and Hannington

Beds, Bucks, Herts
• £7.5million for upgrades and maintenance to our water recycling processes at our centres in Dunstable and Letchworth
• £1.4million to replace the rising main sewers serving Newport Pagnell
• £2million to connect new properties in Bletchley and Leighton Buzzard to the public sewer, facilitating growth in our region
• Almost a million pounds through two schemes in Milton Keynes and Bedford to better manage water pressure in our pipes, reducing the likelihood of leaks and bursts by up to 60%
• £25,000 to match fund flood projects in collaboration with Bedfordshire’s partner agencies such as local authorities also responsible for the drainage system. This money will get more flood prevention schemes off the ground and help to overcome the challenges of often complex ownership responsibilities across the wider drainage network
• Hundreds of thousands of pounds in Milton Keynes fitting free water meters, replacing old ones, and offering free water saving devices so customers remain in control of their bill

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